Tag Archives: divorce

Cindy’s Newest Book Now Available!

Dear friends, I am pleased to announce the release of my newest book, “An Extraordinary Ordinary Life:  A Testimony of God’s Faithfulness.”

“An Extraordinary Ordinary Life” chronicles a host of profound and life-changing events that have taken place since I began my life of faith 40 years ago.   Since that life-altering moment, I have been awed to hear God’s warm, inaudible voice, felt His promptings, seen His undeniable provision and even witnessed healings and miracles.

In sharing these true-to-life accounts, it is my hope that readers will see the very personal nature of the amazing God I am privileged to know and serve.  He has transformed my otherwise ordinary life into one that is truly extraordinary.  I know He wishes to do the same for all who know Him, to allow His children the opportunity to look back and know that they too have lived extraordinary, if ordinary, lives.

One reader emailed me personally to share (in part), “I just finished your book.  I’m trying to describe how [I] feel…  I’m so full and satisfied and so thankful. Every time I read your writings, I’m left with greater clarity and truth. This by far, was no exception.  The entire book leads us (the readers) to Jesus.  

Every. Single. Page.”

“An Extraordinary Ordinary Life” is  available on Kindle ($4.95) and as a paperback on Amazon ($14.95).

I would love to hear from any of you who decide to dive in…

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Lessons in Crazy-Making

Lessons in Crazy-Making

It was not just a bad night among many, it was an insane night.  Our four kids were all asleep in their beds when my husband and I got into an argument about something rather menial, but he quickly escalated into a rage.  Having no success in calming him, concerned for the kids and seeing the extreme manner of his response, I simply said, “I think you need to leave.” 

At that point, he exploded.

“Oh, you want me to leave, do you!?  Well, if that’s what you want, then that’s what you’ll get!”  He immediately went out into the garage and grabbed a couple of suitcases, returned and marched upstairs, tromping as he went while he continued his tirade.  I followed him up the stairs and tried to calm him down and asked him to be quiet so as not to wake the kids, but this was his moment to make a scene.  He went into the bedroom, tossed the suitcases on the bed and began grabbing his clothes from the closet and loading them up.  He grabbed his conga drums and other instruments, dragged them downstairs and began loading them and other favorite possessions into his van.

 “I’m asking you to leave until you can calm down,” I tried to explain. 

 “You said you want me to leave, so that’s what I’m going to do!”  

It wasn’t long before the kids were awakened.  When they came out of their rooms rubbing their eyes and asking about all the commotion, their father loudly told them that I was making him leave.  They all gathered together on the eldest daughter’s bed, held one another and cried, while I working to convince the man that he was being irrational (which didn’t go over too well) while simultaneously trying to assure the kids that everything would be okay. 

 After about 45 minutes of loading up his van, he came in and told me he was tired and was going to go to bed and would finish up in the morning.

 “Fine,” I conceded.  He went to bed, I was able to get our somewhat traumatized kids back to their beds, and I slept in the sofa-bed downstairs, where I had been sleeping for months. 

The next morning, I woke early and called my supervisor at work to let him know I would not be in, as my husband was moving out, and I needed to make some arrangements for the kids.  I got the kids off to school, returned home and was drinking a cup of coffee at the kitchen table when my husband slowly trudged downstairs.  Seeing me in the kitchen, he said calmly, “What are you doing home?”

“I stayed home to take care of the kids,” I reminded him, “since you’re leaving.”

He gave me an incredulous look and shook his head as though I had lost my mind.  “I don’t know what you’re talking about.  I’m not going anywhere,” he said, and retreated back upstairs to take a shower.

I would like to say that I was surprised by the absurdity of it all at that moment, but I wasn’t.  My former husband had obtained pro status when it came to responding severely and irrationally.  By the final year of our marriage, the word I mentally used to describe our relationship was “insane.”  It was. Continue reading Lessons in Crazy-Making

The Sympathy Bond

It is a strange thing to comprehend:  most of us as abuse victims actually feel sorry for the person abusing us.  Why is that?  How can it be that, after all he* has put us through, we choose to see this person who treats us contemptuously as a fragile, hapless creature worthy of our patience and understanding?

In my own experience and having had the opportunity to work directly with many victims, there are several things that may keep us feeling sorry for the guy – and subsequently bound to him. Continue reading The Sympathy Bond

The See-No-Evil Disconnect: Abandoning Victims to Protect the Status Quo

“He who justifies the wicked and he who condemns the righteous, both of them alike are an abomination to the Lord.”  Proverbs 17:15

see no evil

It happens all the time.  A victim of abuse finds the courage to step out of the shadows of her shame and fear to reveal the truth about what has happened to her.  The trauma she has endured may be a result of molestation or rape, physical abuse, and/or verbal or emotional abuse.  She wants to believe that, once she shares her terrible secret, the people to whom she reaches out will hear her, validate her and comfort her.  But as horrible and shocking as it may seem, she may not receive what she needs.  For reasons that defy logic, many may rise to defend her perpetrator, and she may instead find herself shamed and shunned and even persecuted.  Such is the absurdity of the See-No-Evil Disconnect.     Continue reading The See-No-Evil Disconnect: Abandoning Victims to Protect the Status Quo

Faith Was Never Meant to be an Add-On

christiannametag

But to the wicked God says, “What right have you to tell of My statutes and to take My covenant in your mouth?  For you hate discipline, and you cast My words behind you.  When you see a thief, you are pleased with him, and you associate with adulterers. You let your mouth loose in evil and your tongue frames deceit.”  Psalm 50:16-19

I have no reason to believe that abusers are believers.  I view them as spiritual actors operating with one foot in the world and the other in the church, exploiting the perception of faith for the sake of image and self-protection.  Abusers choose to cleverly assume a false identity, claiming a title that brings with it a presumption of innocence, legitimacy and authority.  Presented with their good side, the unsuspecting are inclined to presume that the profession of faith is genuine.  We generously choose to give a fellow “believer” the benefit of the doubt.  To be sure, the image of faith carries with it many benefits, a presumption of positive moral standing, of good will and intent, of respectability.

Continue reading Faith Was Never Meant to be an Add-On